Skip to content
Skip to content
Search events. View events.
  All Categories
Welcome to Willamette University's Calendar of Events.
Click to subscribe to the current view of events. Click to download events shown in CSV, iCAL or XML format. Click for help in using calendar displays. Print the contents of the current screen.

Advanced Search (New Search)
  From:
  To:


Search
Summary View  Subscribe to RSS feed of current view. January 29, 2015
  
Thursday, January 29, 2015
Event Image Exhibition | "Roger Shimomura: Works on Paper" | Nov. 8 - Feb. 1
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

*WU Campus - Hallie Ford Museum of Art

Throughout his long and distinguished career, Seattle native and Lawrence, Kansas-based artist Roger Shimomura has made prints in a style inspired by his childhood interest in comic books and the traditions of American pop art and Japanese woodcut prints. Born in 1939, Shimomura spent part of his childhood, during WWII, in an internment camp in Idaho and his subsequent work as an artist explores the unique position of being seen as an outsider in one's own country.

Roger Shimomura: Works on Paper has been organized by Director John Olbrantz to complement Roger Shimomura: An American Knockoff, which opens January 17, 2015, in the Melvin Henderson-Rubio Gallery. 

Roger Shimomura: Works on Paper
 features 29 prints drawn from local and regional collections, including works from his Minidoka Snapshots and Mistaken Identity series, both of which deal with internment camp issues.

More information on the exhibitions and related events:
Roger Shimomura: Works on Paper | November 8, 2014 - February 1, 2015
Roger Shimomura: An American Knockoff
  | January 17 - March 29, 2015 

Event Image Exhibition | Roger Shimomura: An American Knockoff | Jan. 17 – Mar. 29, 2015
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

*WU Campus - Hallie Ford Museum of Art

Organized by the Museum of Art at Washington State University, this exhibition features the artwork of Seattle native and Lawrence, Kansas-based artist Roger Shimomura, whose paintings and prints address socio-political issues of Asian Americans through a style that combines his childhood interest in comic books with the traditions of American Pop art and Japanese woodcut prints. The exhibition will include approximately 50 paintings and prints from the early 1970s to the present, with an emphasis on his recent work.







MORE EXHIBITION INFORMATION







RELATED EVENTS







Lecture



An American Diary



Roger Shimomura



Friday, January 23, 2015 at 7:30 p.m.



More information |

Film



The Legacy of Heart Mountain



Tuesday, February 10, 2015 at 7 p.m.



More information |

Performance



Within the Silence




Presented by Living Voices and written by Ken Mochizuki



Thursday, March 5, 2015 at 7:30 p.m.



More information |

Film



The Cats of Mirikitani



Tuesday, March 10, 2015 at 7 p.m.



More information |

Tuesday Gallery Talks



Start Jan. 20, 2014 and continuing through Mar. 24, 2015



Tours commence at 12:30 p.m.



More information |





Event Image "The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and The Making of American Capitalism"
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM

*WU Campus - Waller Hall

University Convocation: “"The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery And The Making Of American Capitalism" by Edward Baptist”

Historian Edward Baptist (Cornell University) will be speaking at Willamette in the first week of February.  In preparation for his talk, we will convene in small groups to discuss the opening chapter of Baptist’s book which explores the nineteenth century forced migration of enslaved African-Americans from the Upper South to the expanding cotton south.  A PDF of Baptist’s chapter is available by contacting scotlar@willamette.edu.

Mindfulness Meditation
4:15 PM - 5:00 PM

*WU Campus - Waller Hall

This weekly gathering is not open to the public.

The practice of mindfulness refers to our efforts and discipline at being fully present in the now, of living in the present moment. Mindfulness practice nourishes an understanding of the interconnectedness of our lives with the larger world we inhabit, allowing us to develop an enhanced awareness of the present, a stillness that cultivates a mind of love, compassion, kindness and peace. Beginners are most welcome!
Indigenous Cinema
5:00 PM

*WU Campus - Putnam University Center

Join Native American Programs and the Native Indigenous Student Union for the viewing of a film and to share in a Native styled meal. RHYMES FOR YOUNG GHOULS Written and directed by Jeff Barnaby of the Canadian First Nation's tribe Mi'kmaq, Rhymes for Young Ghouls is a revenge-fantasy set in 1976 in the notorious Indian boarding schools. For roughly 100 years, aboriginal children were taken from their families and forced into residential schools that were offshoots of Christian missionaries and supported by the Canadian government. The purpose was to forcefully assimilate First Nation people, essentially stripping the children of their identities and subjecting them to physical, mental and even sexual abuse. But Barnaby wasn't interested in telling a story that was "pity porn." As he told CBC, "If I was going to do a film on that particular topic, I was going to do it in a way that was really irreverent … something that kind of subverted the idea that Native people were victims."

Calendar software powered by Active Data   
Select item(s) to Search
Select item(s) to Search
Select item(s) to Search
Select item(s) to Search