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Summary View  Subscribe to RSS feed of current view. February 23, 2017
  
Thursday, February 23, 2017
Chemawa Indian School Partnership Program Information Sessions (Multi-Day Event)
All Day

*WU Campus - Matthews Hall

Information session on the Chemawa Indian School Partnership Program for Fall 2017. Please consider attending to learn about CISPP and the impact you can have as a mentor and tutor through this program.
Chemawa Indian School Partnership Program Information Sessions (Multi-Day Event)
All Day

*WU Campus - Matthews Hall

Information session on the Chemawa Indian School Partnership Program for Fall 2017. Please consider attending to learn about CISPP and the impact you can have as a mentor and tutor through this program.
Event Image Convocation - NoDAPL: WU delegation's witness


*WU Campus - Waller Hall

NoDAPL; Last fall, four of our Willamette University students and staff, went to join the Oceti Sakowin camp of water protectors on the Standing Rock Sioux reservation, protesting the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline. Come hear their stories and learn more, one week after authorities forced the DAPL protesters to leave the camp.
Event Image Exhibition | Anne Hirondelle: Small Revolutions | Feb. 11 - April 30, 2017
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

*WU Campus - Hallie Ford Museum of Art

The Hallie Ford Museum of Art is pleased to feature the ceramic work and drawings of nationally recognized Port Townsend, Washington artist Anne Hirondelle (née Harvey). “Anne Hirondelle: Small Revolutions” opens February 11 in the Study Gallery and Print Study Center and continues through April 30, 2017.

John Olbrantz, the Maribeth Collins Director says, “Throughout her long and prolific career, Hirondelle has pushed the boundaries of the ceramic medium, making functional vessels and abstract sculptures that are warmly alive and visually engaging. This exhibition explores a period of time during the past six to eight years where her work evolved into an intriguing exploration of abstract vessels where function gives way to sculptural possibilities.”

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE EXHIBITION AND RELATED EVENTS
Event Image Exhibition | Louis Bunce: Dialogue with Modernism | Jan 21 - March 26
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

*WU Campus - Hallie Ford Museum of Art

The Hallie Ford Museum of Art is pleased to present a major retrospective exhibition for Louis Bunce (1907-1983), a legendary Portland painter, printmaker, and teacher who taught at the Museum Art School from 1946 to 1972 and who influenced several generations of Oregon artists. Organized by Professor Emeritus of Art History and Senior Faculty Curator Roger Hull, the exhibition will chronicle the artist’s career over a 57 year period and features 49 paintings drawn from public and private collections throughout the United States.

For more information on this exhibition and related events (reception, lectures and gallergy talks) please visit http://www.willamette.edu/arts/hfma/exhibitions/library/2016-17/louis_bunce_dialogue_modernism.html
Convocation: #NeverAgain#Remember Commemorating the 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM

*WU Campus - Waller Hall

On February 19, 1942, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, a document that authorized the Secretary of War to order the mandatory evacuation of "all persons of Japanese ancestry" from western regions of the United States and their subsequent resettlement in "internment camps." Join faculty and students for a conversation about the experiences of those subject to this order, whose number included Willamette University students compelled to leave the campus, and to reflect on the legacies and lessons of internment for us today.
Event Image Pizza and Nominations!
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

*WU Campus - Putnam University Center

Come and eat pizza and nominate your peers for their co-curricular achievements!

Date: Thursday, February 23rd
Time: 12 - 2 pm
Location: Student Activities (UC 2nd floor)

Committee members will be on-site to help inspire your writing.
FREE PIZZA!




Event Image Lecture | Anjali Vats, J.D., Ph.D.
4:20 PM - 5:20 PM

*WU Campus - Law School

Theorizing the Hyperracial Infringer: Digital Piracy and the Rhetorical Darkening of Russian Whiteness.

Dr. Vats, Visiting Professor of Law at UC Davis, explores the stark binary between the characters of the Western postracial creator and the non-Western hyperracial infringer, with particular emphasis on intellectual property discourse’s role in creating racialized anti-citizens. Focusing on the rhetorical construction of Russian piracy and counterfeiting, it illustrates how the hyperracial infringer is constructed and deployed in public culture. Other than the Ukraine, Russia is the only nation that has been consistently included on the US’s Special 301 Priority Watch List and historically constructed as racially white. In a curious example of infringement discourse, Russians are highlighted for the mafia-style criminal copying and their participation in organized crime rings, functionally racially darkening them. Drawing upon work in whiteness studies, this talk contends that Russians are painted as “bad apples,” in Richard Dyer's words, their racial identities intimately tied to their real and imagined infringement of intellectual property rights. Demonizing Russians, a practice with considerable historical precedent in the United States, creates space for American exceptionalism as well as neoliberal capitalist expansion through the differentiation of obedient/unruly whiteness in politically and culturally advantageous ways. Dr. Vats' research is focused on rhetorics of race in law and popular culture. Professor Vats is currently working on a monograph entitled Created Differences: Intellectual Properties and Racial Formation in the Making of Americans which considers how political, popular, and legal discourse about copyrights, trademark, and patents shape our understandings of race, citizenship, and the capacity to engage in valuable intellectual labor. She has published articles in the Quarterly Journal of Speech, Communication, Culture & Critique, Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies, and Southern Communication Journal. She has also co-authored law review articles in the Duquesne Law Review and Wayne Law Review. In 2016, Professor Vats was awarded an AAUW Postdoctoral Fellowship and an Exemplary Diversity Scholar Citation from the National Center for Institutional Diversity at the University of Michigan. Prior to teaching, she clerked for the Honorable A. William Maupin of the Supreme Court of Nevada.
Event Image Lear's Daughters
7:30 PM - 9:30 PM

Originally devised in 1987 by the Women’s Theatre Group in collaboration with Elaine Feinstein, Lear’s Daughters tells the story of what happened to King Lear’s daughters, Goneril, Regan and Cordelia, before they made their entrances in Shakespeare’s classic play. The daughters, isolated from their busy parents, find themselves under the care of a nanny who brings sustenance in the form of storytelling. This provocative play explores innocence turned to tragic cynicism. It is a playful but serious modern parable for our time.

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